logo circle plain

Business & Clinical

Work Related Stress -Impact on business

Over the past year, due to Covid-19, challenges to our psychological and physical health are very real and well documented. This is particularly the case for our essential frontline workers.
The exceptional stresses on individuals in the workplace can percolate into our home life which, without support and intervention can lead to heightened levels of difficulty.

Employers who want to support their staff are increasingly looking to Mindfulness Based Interventions to benefit their staff and their business.

79% in 2020

In 2020, of British adults in employment – a staggering 79% commonly experience work-related stress. This makes work-related stress the most common form of stress in the UK.
Compared to 59% in 2018 – the data reveals that work-related stress is on the rise. 

“In order to encourage a healthy workplace, organisations need to look beyond sickness absence rates alone and develop a solid, evidence-based understanding of the underlying causes of work-related stress and unhealthy behaviour like presenteeism.”
Rachel Suff, Senior Employment Relations Adviser at the CIPD

M
B
I

Bespoke evidence based mindfulness interventions - M.B.I. - in the workplace, business & clinical.

We have both had a long career in the NHS working in the Mental Health field. Some of our best work is in the clinical field and we have been delivering MBSR in a Worcestershire GP practice for those experiencing stress and anxiety for 18 months. Data collected from this work using the Self Assessment Anxiety Rating Scale shows a reduction in anxiety and stress related symptoms after an 8 week course, which is maintained at 3 months. Our follow up sessions enable the deepening of mindfulness practice for those who have attended the courses.

Mindfulness helps to develop resilience in developing skills to buffer against disruptive factors, particularly in professional relationships. Developing resilience captures the capacity to rebound from adversity, conflict, and failure and to develop as a result of these challenges (Luthans, Avolio, Avey, & Norman, 2007) 

Mindfulness helps to develop resilience in developing skills to buffer against disruptive factors, particularly in professional relationships. Developing resilience captures the capacity to rebound from adversity, conflict, and failure and to develop as a result of these challenges (Luthans, Avolio, Avey, & Norman, 2007). Resilient employees not only recover but also may grow in the face of adversity. Hope, resilience, optimism, and efficacy individually and as a composite higher‐order factor predicted work performance and satisfaction.

· Greater resilience

· Lower levels of stress and illness related absenteeism

· Lower levels of staff turnover

· Effective communication

· Stronger teams and leaders

· Reduced workplace conflict

· Superior creativity and innovation

· Improved productivity

· Improved employee engagement

· Confidence around change

· Positive wellbeing

(Chaskalson, 2011)

The Present developed by Sarah Silverton www.sarahsilvertonmindfulness.co.uk and colleagues.

This 8 week course is a newly developed mindfulness intervention, based on more recent research, which indicates that shorter more everyday mindfulness practices can be effective. This course proposes that all that is required is for us to notice our experience whilst we go about our lives and helps to develop wise choices about how we can use this knowledge to bring about any necessary change.

It has an approach which is flexible enough to be used in many different environments and is particularly helpful in business and clinical settings, where pressure and stress is high, but time for practice is limited.

Collaboration between the teachers and participants allows a really meaningful experience, whilst at the same time sharing the science which underpins how mindfulness can bring positive change.

As with all our teaching we maintain high standards of care, confidentiality and safety. It is delivered with consideration and a professional approach. 

“Most of us are quite practiced at being supportive and giving to others, especially those of us who find ourselves in caregiver roles.  Whether we have a special needs child, a parent with Alzheimer’s, an ill partner, or are in a care-giving profession such as being a nurse, therapist, or teacher, we know to give support, comfort and compassion to the people who need us.  But how many of us offer that same level of compassion and care to ourselves?

When caregivers continually give out to others without being kind, caring and supportive toward themselves, they’ll eventually burn out.  We need to have self-compassion in order to recharge our batteries and have the emotional energy needed to serve others. 

Self-compassion has been shown to protect caregivers from burnout and compassion fatigue, and to increase satisfaction with one’s care-giving role.

Self-compassion is crucial for caregivers – not only because it helps us forgive ourselves for our inevitable mistakes – but also because it allows us to acknowledge and comfort ourselves for the difficulties of our care-giving role. 

If you’re a caregiver, try giving yourself compassion the next time you make a mistake or feel challenged beyond your ability to cope.  Not only will it help to get through difficult situations, it will lead to greater happiness and peace of mind.”

These are the words of Kristin Neff, Professor of Educational Psychology at the University of Texas, author, and a leading expert on mindful self-compassion. She is the  co-creator of the Mindful Self-Compassion courses taught by Sonia and Jean.

Courses for work related stress:

Contact us to discuss the needs of your workplace

Where: We are happy to attend your place of work, or another chosen venue.
Costs: Costs on application following discussion.

Subscribe to our newsletter

Keep up to date with the latest events and information from Malvern Mindfulness.

Subscribe to our newsletter

Keep up to date with the latest events and information from Malvern Mindfulness. 

Please keep me informed about: