logowithglowandtext3

Business & Clinical

W.R.S.
Work Related Stress -
Impact on business

In October 2018 figures published by the Labour Force Survey show nationally:

1 M
Days
lost to
W.R.S
1 %
of work-related ill health
1 B
£'s cost of W.R.S ill health

‘Presenteeism’
Employees coming into work when they are ill,
has more than tripled since 2010.

Increased presenteeism is associated with increases in common mental health conditions as well as stress-related absence, which are among the top causes of long-term sickness absence. 
Ill health cases result in a more time off work than other causes, which drives higher costs.

“Increasingly the threats to well-being in the modern workplace are psychological rather than physical, and yet too few organisations are discouraging unhealthy workplace practices and tackling stress, which is strongly linked to health conditions such as anxiety and depression. 
In order to encourage a healthy workplace, organisations need to look beyond sickness absence rates alone and develop a solid, evidence-based understanding of the underlying causes of work-related stress and unhealthy behaviour like presenteeism.”
Rachel Suff, Senior Employment Relations Adviser at the CIPD

‘Presenteeism’
Employees coming into work when they are ill,
has more than tripled since 2010.

Increased presenteeism is associated with increases in common mental health conditions as well as stress-related absence, which are among the top causes of long-term sickness absence. 
Ill health cases result in a more time off work than other causes, which drives higher costs.

“Increasingly the threats to well-being in the modern workplace are psychological rather than physical, and yet too few organisations are discouraging unhealthy workplace practices and tackling stress, which is strongly linked to health conditions such as anxiety and depression. 
In order to encourage a healthy workplace, organisations need to look beyond sickness absence rates alone and develop a solid, evidence-based understanding of the underlying causes of work-related stress and unhealthy behaviour like presenteeism.”
Rachel Suff, Senior Employment Relations Adviser at the CIPD

M
B
I

Bespoke evidence based mindfulness interventions - M.B.I. - in the workplace, business & clinical.

We have both had a long career in the NHS working in the Mental Health field. Some of our best work is in the clinical field and we have been delivering MBSR in a Worcestershire GP practice for those experiencing stress and anxiety for 18 months. Data collected from this work using the Self Assessment Anxiety Rating Scale shows a reduction in anxiety and stress related symptoms after an 8 week course, which is maintained at 3 months. Our follow up sessions enable the deepening of mindfulness practice for those who have attended the courses.

Mindfulness helps to develop resilience in developing skills to buffer against disruptive factors, particularly in professional relationships. Developing resilience captures the capacity to rebound from adversity, conflict, and failure and to develop as a result of these challenges (Luthans, Avolio, Avey, & Norman, 2007) 

We are happy to share data with other GP practices and clinical settings on application to explore whether this may be of interest in your clinical area.

‘Presenteeism’ has more than tripled since 2010, according to the latest Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) Health and Well-being at Work (2018) survey. Increased presenteeism is associated with increases in reported common mental health conditions as well as stress-related absence, which are among the top causes of long-term sickness absence, according to the survey.

In October 2018 figures published by the Labour Force Survey (LFS) show that nationally about 15.4 m days are lost to Work Related Stress (WRS). The causes cited are: Workload increase (44%),  perceived lack of support (14%), bullying or threats (13%),  changes at work (8%), other (21%)

The total costs of workplace self-reported injuries and ill health in 2016/17 was £15.0 billion with ill health causing the biggest proportion of total costs at around 65% (£9.7 billion). Ill health contributes to a greater proportion of total costs, despite injuries accounting for a greater proportion of cases, as ill health cases result in a more time off work on average, which drives higher costs.

Work-related stress, depression or anxiety is defined as a harmful reaction people have to undue pressures and demands placed on them at work. The latest estimates from the Labour Force Survey (LFS) show: The total number of cases of work related stress, depression or anxiety in 2017/18 was 595,000, a prevalence rate of 1,800 per 100,000 workers. In 2017/18 stress, depression or anxiety accounted for 44% of all work-related ill health cases and 57% of all working days lost due to ill health. Stress, depression or anxiety is more prevalent in public service industries, such as education; health and social care; and public administration and defence. By occupation, professional occupations that are common across public service industries (such as healthcare workers; teaching professionals and public service professionals) show higher levels of stress as compared to all jobs, 2,100 per 100,000.

Interest in mindfulness, defined in basic terms as present-centred attention and awareness (Brown & Ryan, 2003), is surging. The reason for this interest is simple and compelling—mindfulness appears to have broadly positive impacts on human functioning (Brown, Ryan, & Creswell, 2007) and is therefore seen to be of benefit in the workplace.

Mindfulness helps to develop resilience in developing skills to buffer against disruptive factors, particularly in professional relationships. Developing resilience captures the capacity to rebound from adversity, conflict, and failure and to develop as a result of these challenges (Luthans, Avolio, Avey, & Norman, 2007). Resilient employees not only recover but also may grow in the face of adversity. Hope, resilience, optimism, and efficacy individually and as a composite higher‐order factor predicted work performance and satisfaction.

Another aspect of mindfulness training is the development of a decentred perspective (Bishop et al., 2004) in response to stressful external events (i.e., layoffs, office politics, an abusive boss) with a decentred perspective, perceived stresses are experienced as less threatening.

· Greater resilience

· Lower levels of stress and illness related absenteeism

· Lower levels of staff turnover

· Effective communication

· Stronger teams and leaders

· Reduced workplace conflict

· Superior creativity and innovation

· Improved productivity

· Improved employee engagement

· Confidence around change

· Positive wellbeing

(Chaskalson, 2011)

Contact us to discuss the needs of your workplace

Where: We are happy to attend your place of work, or another chosen venue.
Costs: Costs on application following discussion.